What's in that Bottle. What’s on the Label.

Date March 6, 2008 | Sean | Editorials & Wine Basics
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The big guys are very protective of their brands and the big dollars they command for a bottle that come along with it. That's in its self isn't really news, just ask anyone at BMW, Prada or Armani. But here is a little gem about the wine industry big boys. It's not unusual for them to press too much juice, or press a second lot of juice. There could be any number of reasons why they decide not to use the juice. But some have speculated they don't want to flood the market with too much premium product so not to devalue their brand. We don't know about this for sure, but here is what we do know. The excess juice is sometimes sold to another winery in secret or wine is made by the winery and marketed under a different label. Here's where it gets interesting. These wines are often nearly identical to their much more premium relatives, but can cost up to half the price. It's hard to know when this will happen, or where grapes come from. But sometimes the rumors are just so strong that word gets out, and sometimes the writing is on the wall. And we found one (kinda)! In the case of Tangley Oaks and Rutherford Hill it's not a big secret that they are owned by the same company. The Tangley Oaks Merlot from 2003 is exceptionally good stuff. It shares a lot of characteristics from it's big brother Rutherford Hill 2003 Merlot which is $10 more a bottle. This is likely a second pressing from the same vineyard, or a blend. But who cares! At $17.95 a bottle this is simply too good to pass bye. See the Tangley Oaks Review. Rutherford Hill Label
 

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