Reviews in Category: Beer (Clear Filter)

American Yeast Comparison: WLP001 vs US-05 vs WLP090 vs Conan

Date January 11, 2005 | Chuck | Beer & Homebrew

Experiment Date: October 2015

White Labs: WLP090 San Diego Super

Will use in future batches where a more malt forward profile is required.  Rye Pale Ales, RIS, Stouts, Some mellow ales.  Middle of the road, less hop presence than WLP001, maltier, had the most head.

 

White Labs: WLP001 California Ale

Will use in future batches where hops are featured.  IPA, Pales, Blonde.  Needs whirlfloc more that WLP090.  Very clean, no yeast or malt character.  Bright and slightly fruity.

 

Safale US-05

Will not use in future batches if liquid is available.  Not as clean as WLP001 with more malty and more body.  Was overall lacking and much darker than others.

 

The Yeast Bay: Vermont Ale (Conan)

Will not use in future batches.  Overpowering and makes itself a big part of the recipe.  Peachy, malty, full mouthfeel, lingering finish.  The yeast works faster than the others.

 

 

Recipe Used for an American Blonde Ale (4 gallon batch):

100% Pale Malt (2 Row)
Centennial [11.60 %] - Boil 10.0 min for 20 IBU
2oz Centennial [11.60 %] - Hopstand for 45 min
2oz Simcoe [13.00 %] - Hopstand for 45 min

SG 1.043 (~4.4%) 
20 IBU

 

White Labs: WLP090 San Diego Super
The Yeast Bay: Vermont Ale (Conan)
White Labs: WLP001 California Ale
Safale US-05 

 

Video of Fermentation

Watch on YouTube

Beer Hop Smell Test

Date January 9, 2005 | Chuck | Beer & Homebrew

Hops have many uses in beer making.  They can be used to add bitterness, flavour and aroma.  They can be added in the boil, whirlpool, hopstand or after fermentation happens (know as dry hopping).  Now that you know this, saying a beer is 'hoppy' doesn't make a ton on sense because some people consider hoppy to be very bitter while others use the term to describe a strong hop aroma (late kettle/dry hop).

 

Below are my notes and reviews for hops I've been using.

 

Purchased in 2016
Name (Year) Characteristics Rating out of 3
Cascade (2015)  orange, light tropical ♥♥♥
Citra (2015) tropical, citrus, mandarin ♥♥♥
Columbus (2015) dank, pine, grapefruit ♥♥
Galaxy (2015) tropical, citrus, lime, fruit ♥♥♥
East Kent Goldings (2014) earth, forrest ♥♥
Northern Brewer (2014) forrest, grapefruit ♥♥
Mosaic (2015) ..coming soon..  

 

Purchased in 2015
Name (Year) Characteristics Rating out of 3
Amarillo (2014) Resiny Citrus, Floral, Earth ♥♥.5
Cascade (2014) Grapefruit, Citrus, Light Pine ♥♥♥
Centennial (2014) Floral, Citrus ♥♥
Centennial Type (2013) Light Grapefruit, Slight Lemon Citrus ♥♥.5
Chinook (2014) Pine Tree,  Grapefruit ♥♥
Columbus (2014) Pine Resin, Light Fruit ♥♥
Falconers Flight (2013) Earthy, Citrus, Spice ♥♥
Simcoe (2013) Young Sweet Pine, Light Grass ♥♥♥
Sorachi Ace JP (2013) Lemon, Light Citrus ♥♥
Summit (2012-2013) Onion, Light Garlic, Woods
Orbit NZ (2014) Juicy Fruit, Peach, Tropical, Light Butter ♥♥♥
Waimea NZ (2014) Honeydew, Juicy Fruit, Peach, Light Grass ♥♥.5
Wakatu NZ (2014) Lime, Light Citrus ♥♥

 

 

Beer Malt Taste Test

Date January 8, 2005 | Chuck | Beer & Homebrew

After a handful of odd recipes, I've decided to taste test a bunch of malted barley in order to get a sense of what each style contributes to a finished recipe.  Below are my results.  More to come!  Have an addition?  Please leave a comment!

 

Method: 

1 oz of crushed grain in 250ml 150 degF water for 10 minutes.

 

Base Malts
Malt (Maltster) Grain Characteristics Rating out of 3
2-Row
( OiO aka Gilbertson & Page )
grassy, hay
Pale Ale Malt
( Weyermann )
light malt, slight nut, touch of grass
Overall: light sweet malt
♥♥.5
Golden Promise
( Thomas Fawcett )

Between 2-Row

&

Pale Ale Malt ( Weyermann )

♥♥♥
Vienna (Weyermann)

straw, light toast

♥♥.5

 

 

Light Malts
Malt (Maltster) Grain Characteristics Rating out of 3
Munich 10 malty, no grass, golden hay ♥♥
Aromatic medium done white toast ♥♥
Melanoidin barley soup, very plain, flat
Honey honey, butterscotch, bit fruity
Victory woody, nutty (hazel/walnut) ♥♥
Carabelge (Weyermann)
11-15.5°L
light leather, malty
CaraHell (Weyermann)
8.1 - 11.8L
malty v.light chocolate, tangy, c15-20 like

 

 

Crystal / Caramel Malts
Malt (Maltster) Grain Characteristics Rating out of 3
Caravienne 20 light-med caramel, slightly sweet ♥♥♥
Caramel 20 darker than Caravienne 20, med-dark caramel, nutty ♥♥♥
Crystal 40 solid medium caramel ♥♥♥
Crystal 60 toffee, sweet dark-med caramel, light tannins ♥♥♥
Caramel Munich 60 (Briess) sweet malty caramel, slight coffee ♥♥
Crystal 90 molasses ♥♥
Crystal 120 burnt raisins, dark toffee, light coffee ♥♥

 

 

Roasted Malts
Malt (Maltster) Grain Characteristics Rating out of 3
Special B weak coffee, slight toffee, raisin ♥♥
Brown mocha ♥♥
Pale Chocolate medium astringency, old coffee, burnt toffee ♥♥
Chocolate bitter dark chocolate, coffee
Roasted Barley tar, ultra roasted coffee, guinness like
Black Patent burnt plastic, ashy .5

 

Other
Malt (Maltster) Grain Characteristics Rating out of 3
Rye (Weyermann) watered down whiskey ♥♥

 

 

 

Whitby Water Profile

Date January 8, 2005 | Chuck | Beer & Homebrew

From my experience campden tablets are good don't replace a physical low-flow chlorine and chloramine water filter.  This is twice as important in Whitby since the water smells like a swimming pool (night and day difference compared to Toronto)

 

Modifying your water profile is one of the last hurdles for an advanced homebrewer.  Changing your water will not make a bad beer good.  It will make a great beer...fantastic.

 

Your city's water profile will affect your final beer.  You can manipulate how a beer is perceived by fine tuning your water's mineral profile.  For example: higher calcium and sulfate levels can make your hops and bitterness brighter and less will lend itself to a maltier beer.

 

To help me figure out the amount by weight of my water additions I use EZWaterCalculator.  There's also the popular Bru'n Water (more powerful but has a big learning curve).  Having tried both, I've found the numbers come out very close. 
 

 

City of Whitby
  From the City
August 2016
Calcium (Ca ppm) 35.63
Magnesium (Mg ppm) 9
Sodium 15.36
Chloride (Cl ppm) 28.72
Sulfate (SO4 ppm) 30.1
Bicarbonate (HCo3) ?
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) ?
Total Alkalinity (CaCO3) 85.67
pH 7.58

 

Toronto Water Profile for Homebrew Beer

Date January 7, 2005 | Chuck | Beer & Homebrew

Modifying your water profile is one of the last hurdles for an advanced homebrewer.  Changing your water will not make a bad beer good.  It will make a great beer...fantastic.

 

Your city's water profile will affect your final beer.  You can manipulate how a beer is perceived by fine tuning your water's mineral profile.  For example: higher calcium and sulfate levels can make your hops and bitterness brighter and less will lend itself to a maltier beer.

 

To help me figure out the amount by weight of my water additions I use EZWaterCalculator.  There's also the popular Bru'n Water (more powerful but has a big learning curve).  Having tried both, I've found the numbers come out very close. 
 

City of Toronto
  Toronto Water
June 2015
Ward Labs 2014
3rd Party Analysis
Calcium (Ca ppm) 34.1 41
Magnesium (Mg ppm) 8.78 11
Sodium 13.7 18
Chloride (Cl ppm) 26.5 27
Sulfate (SO4 ppm) 28 11
Bicarbonate (HCo3) ? 113
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) ? 202
Total Alkalinity (CaCO3) 87.8 93
pH 7.56 7.6

 

Link: Toronto Water Quality Website

 

How to keep fruit flies out of your airlock

Date January 6, 2005 | Chuck | Beer & Homebrew

A common issue I've seen in homebrew forums is regarding fruit flies getting into the airlock.  Most airlocks have caps with tiny holes to let gas escape but large enough to let fruit flies in (then they drown in the sanitizer)  

 

I'd prefer they not get in at all so here's my air lock hack:  Simply twist a napkin around the top portion of the cap! 

 

 


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